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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Home-range studies in a reintroduced brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) population in the Grampians National Park, Victoria

Published source details

Molyneux J., Taggart D.A., Corrigan A. & Frey S. (2011) Home-range studies in a reintroduced brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) population in the Grampians National Park, Victoria. Australian Mammalogy, 33, 128-134


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2009–2010 of a woodland area and adjacent escarpment in Victoria, Australia (Molyneux et al. 2011) found that most captive-bred brush-tailed rock-wallabies Petrogale penicillata survived for at least five months after release and established stable home ranges. Four animals from five released were alive at least five months after release. One animal died two months after release, from undetermined causes. Additionally, three animals from an earlier release that were alive 11 months after release all survived to at least 16 months after release. Rock-wallabies established stable home ranges of 16.2–41.5 ha in extent, with core areas of 1.2–4.5 ha. Five captive-bred brush-tailed rock-wallabies were released in October 2009. Three from a release in November 2008 that were still alive in October 2009 were also monitored. Wallabies were monitored by radio-tracking, through October 2009 and for two weeks in March 2010.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)