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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Movement and survival parameters of translocated and resident swift foxes Vulpes velox

Published source details

Moehrenschlager A. & Macdonald D.W. (2003) Movement and survival parameters of translocated and resident swift foxes Vulpes velox. Animal Conservation, 6, 199-206


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1994–1998 at seven temperate grassland sites along the USA–Canada border (Moehrenschlager & Macdonald 2003) found that most translocated swift foxes Vulpes velox that had been held in captivity prior to release and were released in social groups survived for at least one year, and some reproduced near release sites. Eleven of 18 (61%) translocated swift foxes survived at least one year after release. Of these, 60% of animals translocated as juveniles went on to reproduce, as did 33% of translocated adults. In 1994–1996 foxes were captured in Wyoming, fitted with radio-collars and held in captivity for 22–57 days. In autumn 1994–1996, animals were released in mixed-gender groups of up to three individuals that had been trapped in close proximity. Release sites were located in areas with pre-existing, but small, fox populations and with low numbers of predators and high prey availability. Foxes were monitored by visual surveys and ground-based and aerial radio-tracking.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1994–1998 at seven temperate grassland sites along the USA–Canada border (Moehrenschlager & Macdonald 2003) found that most translocated swift foxes Vulpes velox, which had been held in captivity prior to release and were released in social groups, survived for at least one year, and some reproduced near release sites. Eleven of 18 (61%) translocated swift foxes survived at least one year after release. Of these, 60% of animals translocated as juveniles went on to reproduce, as did 33% of translocated adults. In 1994–1996, foxes were captured in Wyoming, USA, and were fitted with radio-collars while being held in captivity for 22–57 days. In autumn 1994–1996, animals were released in mixed-gender groups of up to three individuals which had been trapped in close proximity. Release sites were located in areas with pre-existing, but small, fox populations and with low numbers of predators and high prey availability. Foxes were monitored by visual surveys and ground-based and aerial radio-tracking.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )