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Individual study: Characterizing the post-recolonization of Antechinus flavipes and its genetic implications in a production forest landscape

Published source details

Mijangos J.L., Pacioni C., Spencer P.B.S., Hillyer M. & Craig M.D. (2017) Characterizing the post-recolonization of Antechinus flavipes and its genetic implications in a production forest landscape. Restoration Ecology, 25, 738-748


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Restore former mining sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A site comparison study in 2005–2012 of jarrah forest at a site in Western Australia, Australia (Mijangos et al. 2017) found that in areas of forest restored following mining, genetic diversity of yellow-footed antechinus Antechinus flavipes was similar to that in unmined forest. Allelic richness (a measure of genetic diversity) was similar in restored forest (9.1) to that in unmined forest (9.1). Genetic analysis was based on 24 samples from restored forest and 33 from unmined forest. DNA samples were extracted from antechinus caught in pit and cage traps in 17 trapping grids in restored mine areas (3–21 years post-mining) and 22 grids in unmined forest areas. Grids were, on average, 1,095 m apart. Traps were operated for three or four periods of two weeks, each year, in 2005–2012.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)