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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Moose movement and mortality associated with the Glenn Highway expansion

Published source details

McDonald M.G. (1991) Moose movement and mortality associated with the Glenn Highway expansion. Alces, 27, 208-219


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use road lighting to reduce vehicle collisions with mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1977–1990 along a highway in Alaska, USA (McDonald 1991) found that road lighting reduced vehicle collisions with moose Alces alces. There were 65% fewer moose-vehicle collisions when lighting was installed compared to before its installation (actual numbers not stated). There were 95% fewer moose-vehicle collisions along the section with lighting, fencing with one-way gates and an underpass after they were installed (0.7/year) than before (17/year). Overall mortality along the entire stretch of road was lower after installation of lighting, barrier fencing and an underpass, with fewer collisions (12/year) than previously (38/year). In October 1987, road lighting was installed along 11.5 km of the highway. Fencing and 30 one-way gates were installed along 5.5 km of this section and an underpass was created. Moose-vehicle collisions were monitored before (1977–1987) and after (1987–1990) installation.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install one-way gates or other structures to allow wildlife to leave roadways Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1977–1990 in Alaska, USA (McDonald 1991) found that barrier fencing with one-way gates, along with an underpass and road lighting, reduced vehicle collisions with moose Alces alces. Effects of fencing, gates, lighting and the underpass could not be separated. There were fewer moose-vehicle collisions after installation of fencing with one-way gates, an underpass and lighting (0.7/year) than before (17/year). There was no significant difference in the distribution of moose in relation to the highway between after and before fence installation. A total of 17 moose were observed using one-way gates and tracks suggested gates were used frequently. However, this meant that moose were regularly getting onto the highway. The first gates installed stayed open if swung all the way open and gates got stuck open below 0°C, because of the lubricant used. In October 1987, road lighting was installed along 11.5 km of the highway. Fencing and 30 one-way gates were installed along 5.5 km of this section and an underpass was created. Moose-vehicle collisions were monitored before (1977–1987) and after (1987–1990) installation. One-way gates were monitored using track counts in snow.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install barrier fencing and underpasses along roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1977–1990 along a highway in Alaska, USA (McDonald 1991) found that barrier fencing with one-way gates, along with an underpass and road lighting, reduced vehicle collisions with moose Alces alces. Effects of fencing and the underpass could not be separated from those of gates and lighting. There were fewer moose-vehicle collisions after installation of fencing with one-way gates, an underpass and lighting (0.7/year) than before (17/year). There was no significant difference in the distribution of moose in relation to the highway after and before fence installation. A total of 17 moose were observed using one-way gates and tracks suggested gates were used frequently. However, this meant that moose were regularly getting onto the highway. The first gates installed stayed open if swung all the way open and gates got stuck open below 0°C, because of the lubricant used. In October 1987, road lighting was installed along 11.5 km of the highway. Fencing and 30 one-way gates were installed along 5.5 km of this section and an underpass was created. Moose-vehicle collisions were monitored before (1977–1987) and after (1987–1990) installation. One-way gates were monitored using track counts in snow.

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)