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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Re-introduction of globally threatened Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica (Pallas, 1766) (Mammalia: Bovidae) in fenced protected area in central Saudi Arabia

Published source details

Islam M.Z., Shah M.S. & Boug A. (2014) Re-introduction of globally threatened Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica (Pallas, 1766) (Mammalia: Bovidae) in fenced protected area in central Saudi Arabia. Journal of Threatened Taxa, 6, 6053-6060


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary water to increase reproduction/survival Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 of a dry dwarf-scrubland site in Saudi Arabia (Islam et al. 2014) found that released captive-bred Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica initially provided with supplementary water and food after release into a fenced area started breeding in the year following the first releases. Seven females gave birth in August–September of the year after the first releases and all calves survived to at least the end of the year. Of 49 gazelles released over three years, 10 had died by the time of the final releases. In 2011–2014, three groups of captive-born gazelles, totalling 49 animals, were released in a 2,244-km2 fenced reserve. They were moved from a wildlife research centre and held for 23 days to a few months before release in enclosures measuring 500 × 500 m. Water and food was provided for three weeks following release. Released gazelles were radio-tracked from the ground and air.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 of a dry dwarf-scrubland site in Saudi Arabia (Islam et al. 2014) found that captive-bred Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica released into a fenced reserve after being kept in holding pens started breeding in the year following the first releases. Seven females gave birth in August–September of the year after the first releases and all calves survived to the year end at least. Of 49 gazelles released over three years, 10 had died by the time of the final releases. In 2011–2014, three groups of captive-born gazelles, totalling 49 animals, were released in a 2,244-km2 fenced reserve. They were moved from a wildlife research centre and kept for 23 days to a few months in holding pens (500 × 500 m) prior to release at the reserve. Water and food was provided for three weeks following release. Released gazelles were radio-tracked from the ground and air.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)

Provide supplementary food during/after release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 of a dry dwarf-scrubland site in Saudi Arabia (Islam et al. 2014) found that captive-bred Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica provided supplementary food and water after release into a fenced reserve started breeding in the year following the first releases. Seven females gave birth in August–September of the year after the first releases and all calves survived to the year end at least. Of 49 gazelles released over three years, 10 had died by the time of the final releases. In 2011–2014, three groups of captive-born gazelles, totalling 49 animals, were released in a 2,244-km2 fenced reserve. They were moved from a wildlife research centre and kept for 23 days to a few months in holding pens (500 × 500 m) prior to release at the reserve. Water and food was provided for three weeks following release. Released gazelles were radio-tracked from the ground and air.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 of a dry dwarf-scrubland site in Saudi Arabia (Islam et al. 2014) found that captive-bred Arabian gazelles Gazella arabica kept in holding pens prior to release into a fenced reserve started breeding in the year following the first releases. Seven females gave birth in August–September of the year after the first releases and all calves survived to the year end at least. Of 49 gazelles released over three years, 10 had died by the time of the final releases. In 2011–2014, three groups of captive-born gazelles, totalling 49 animals, were released in a 2,244-km2 fenced reserve. They were moved from a wildlife research centre and kept for 23 days to a few months in holding pens (500 × 500 m) prior to release at the reserve. Water and food was provided for three weeks following release. Released gazelles were radio-tracked from the ground and air.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)