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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The reintroduction of large carnivores to the Eastern Cape, South Africa: an assessment

Published source details

Hayward M.W., Kerley G.I.H., Adendorff J., Moolman L.C., O'Brien J., Douglas A.S., Bissett C., Bean P., Fogarty A., Howarth D. & Slater R. (2007) The reintroduction of large carnivores to the Eastern Cape, South Africa: an assessment. Oryx, 41, 205-214


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of studies conducted in 1985–2005 at 11 grassland and dry savanna sites in Eastern Cape, South Africa (Hayward et al. 2007) found that reintroductions (mainly through translocations but including some captive-bred animals) of large carnivores led to increasing population sizes for four of six species. Twenty years after the first releases, there were 56 lions Pantera leo at seven sites (from 31 released), 41 cheetahs Acinonyx jubatu (seven sites, 40 released), 24 African wild dogs Lycaon pictus (two sites, 11 released) and 13 spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta (three sites, 11 released). There were reductions or unknown trends in two species with seven known surviving leopards Panthera pardus (five sites, 15 released) and an unknown number of servals Leptailurus serval (though known to be present - two sites, 16 released). Releases were made in 1985–2005, into 11 protected areas. Most schemes involved translocations of wild-caught animals but at least one of seven lion reintroductions involved captive-bred animals. Monitoring methods are not specified.

(Summarised by Alexandra Sutton )

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of studies conducted in 1985–2005 at 11 grassland and dry savanna sites in Eastern Cape, South Africa (Hayward et al. 2007) found that reintroductions (mainly through translocations) of large carnivores led to increasing population sizes for four of six species. Twenty years after the first releases, there were 56 lions Panthera leo at seven sites (from 31 released), 41 cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus (seven sites, 40 released), 24 African wild dogs Lycaon pictus (two sites, 11 released) and 13 spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta (three sites, 11 released). There were reductions or unknown trends in two species with seven known surviving leopards Panthera pardus (five sites, 15 released) and an unknown number of servals Leptailurus serval (though known to be present - two sites, 16 released). Releases were made in 1985–2005, into 11 protected areas. Most schemes involved translocations of wild-caught animals, but at least one of seven lion reintroductions involved captive-bred animals. Monitoring methods are not specified.

(Summarised by Alexandra Sutton )