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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Visitor impact on grizzly bear activity in Pelican Valley, Yellowstone National Park

Published source details

Gunther K.A. (1990) Visitor impact on grizzly bear activity in Pelican Valley, Yellowstone National Park. Bears: Their Biology and Management, 8, 73-78


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Exclude or limit number of visitors to reserves or protected areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1984–1988 in a meadow and forest area in Wyoming, USA (Gunther 1990) found that restricting human access resulted in greater use of areas by grizzly bears Ursus arctos. Bears were found further from cover during closed and restricted periods (average 293–304 m) than during open periods (average 228 m). Bears were recorded close to campsites more frequently when the campsites were not in use than when they were in use, when sightings were reduced by 67%. Within a 4,850-ha study area, containing 14–23 grizzly bears, meadows and open areas were scanned regularly from a vantage point, for bear and human activity, from May–June through to July–September of 1984–1988. At different periods during this time, the area was classed as open (allowing day-use and overnight camping), restricted (allowing day-use only, but no overnight camping) or closed (no recreational use).

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)