Study

Field application of the conditioned taste aversion paradigm to the control of coyote predation on sheep and turkeys

  • Published source details Ellins S.R. & Catalano S.M. (1980) Field application of the conditioned taste aversion paradigm to the control of coyote predation on sheep and turkeys. Behavioral and Neural Biology, 29, 532-536

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use taste-aversion to reduce predation of livestock by mammals to deter human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Use taste-aversion to reduce predation of livestock by mammals to deter human-wildlife conflict

    A replicated study in 1976–­1977 of six livestock farms in a desert area of California, USA (Ellins & Catalano 1980) found that after taste-aversion treatment, the number of sheep and turkeys killed by coyotes Canis latrans declined over time. In the second year that baits containing lithium chloride (which causes gastrointestinal discomfort) were used, the number of sheep killed by coyotes was lower (59 kills) than in the first year that baits were used (186 kills). The same pattern was true for the numbers of turkeys killed (data not presented). From August 1976 to April 1977, sheep carcasses containing lithium chloride were laid as bait, adjacent to areas where four sheep herds were grazing. Sheep herds were at least 12 km apart. From November 1976 to April 1977, turkey carcasses containing lithium chloride were laid as bait adjacent to two turkey farms. Turkey farms were 27 km apart. Methods used to monitor the numbers of animals killed were unclear.

    (Summarised by: Phil Martin)

Output references

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