Study

A study on the behavior and colonization of translocated greater one-horned rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae) during 90 days from their release at Manas National Park, Assam India

  • Published source details Dutta D.K. & Mahanta R. (2015) A study on the behavior and colonization of translocated greater one-horned rhinos Rhinoceros unicornis (Mammalia: Perissodactyla: Rhinocerotidae) during 90 days from their release at Manas National Park, Assam India. Journal of Threatened Taxa, 7, 6864-6877

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Hand-rear orphaned or abandoned young in captivity

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Hand-rear orphaned or abandoned young in captivity

    A study in 2006–2013 in a grassland reserve in Assam, India (Dutta & Mahanta 2015) found that most orphaned or abandoned greater one-horned rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis calves survived for at least 6 or 7 years after release and gave birth in the wild. Three of four orphaned or abandoned female rhinoceroses were still alive 6–7 years after release into the wild, and all three gave birth to calves in 2013. The fourth animal died eight months after release, in October 2008. Four female rhinoceroses aged 1–5 months old were rescued in Kaziranga National Park, and hand-reared at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation. In January and February 2006–2008, at two or three years of age, the calves were moved to the 519-km2 Manas National Park, and held in a 600-acre fenced enclosure before release (further details not provided).

  2. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A study in 2008–2012 in a grassland reserve in Assam, India (Dutta & Mahanta 2015) found that translocated greater one-horned rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis, some of which were cow-calf pairs, all survived at least 90 days after release. All 18 rhinoceroses survived more than >90 days after being released. During the first day after release, rhinoceroses dispersed an average of 2.4 km from the release site. Sixteen out of 18 rhinoceroses moved in the same direction to the bank of a river. Most cow-calf pairs separated after release, but were reunited within 24 hours. Between April 2008 and March 2012, twelve adult rhinoceroses and six calves (2–3 years old) were translocated from Kaziranga National Park and Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary to the 519-km2 Manas National Park. Rhinoceroses were released in groups of 2–4, often containing cow-calf pairs. Animals were radio-collared and located three times/day over 90 days after release. Tracking was carried out by foot, elephant back, motorcycle or vehicle.

Output references

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