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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Endangered jackrabbit Lepus flavigularis prefers to establish its feeding and resting sites on pasture with cattle presence [La liebre amenazada Lepus flavigularis prefiere establecer sus sitios de alimentación y descanso en potreros con presencia de ganado]

Published source details

Luna-Casanova A., Rioja-Paradela T., Scott-Morales L. & Carrillo-Reyes A. (2016) Endangered jackrabbit Lepus flavigularis prefers to establish its feeding and resting sites on pasture with cattle presence [La liebre amenazada Lepus flavigularis prefiere establecer sus sitios de alimentación y descanso en potreros con presencia de ganado]. Therya, 7, 277-284


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manage vegetation using livestock grazing Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, paired sites study in 2014 in 10 pastures in Oaxaca, Mexico (Luna-Casanova et al. 2016) found that in pastures grazed by cattle, Tehuantepec jackrabbits Lepus flavigularis spent more time feeding than they did in pastures not grazed by cattle. When in pastures with cattle, Tehuantepec jackrabbits spent more time feeding (75%) than when in pastures without cattle (66%). The study was conducted in five pastures with cattle (average of 16 cows/pasture) and five pastures without. Pastures averaged 11 ha extent and were located next to each other. Cattle moved freely within each pasture. In March 2014, twenty-two adult jackrabbits were captured, radio-tagged and released at the capture site. Animals were followed for ≤10 days in March and September 2014. Additionally, jackrabbit behaviour was recorded from five fixed observation sites throughout the study area. The behaviour (eating, resting and socializing) of jackrabbits was recorded between 6:00–10:00 h and 17:00–20:00 h in pastures with or without cattle.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)