Study

O papel do programa lince (LPN/FFI) na recuperação do habitat e presas do lince-ibérico no sul de Portugal

  • Published source details Loureiro F., Martins A.R., Santos E., Lecoq M., Emauz A., Pedroso N.M. & Hotham P. (2011) The role of the Lynx program (LPN / FFI) in the recovery of habitat and prey of the Iberian lynx in Portugal. Galemys, 23, 17-25

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide supplementary water to increase reproduction/survival

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Provide artificial refuges/breeding sites

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Provide supplementary food to increase reproduction/survival

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Provide supplementary water to increase reproduction/survival

    A replicated study in 2009 in four agroforestry sites in Alentejo and Algarve, Portugal (Loureiro et al. 2011) found that artificial waterholes were used by European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus and stone martens Martes foina. European rabbits used four out of 16 artificial waterholes. At least one waterhole was used by stone martens (number of waterholes used by this species is not stated). In September and October 2009, sixteen artificial waterholes in four agroforestry estates dominated by cork Quercus suber (2–6 waterholes/estate) were monitored using camera traps. No description of the waterholes is provided. Waterholes were monitored for 7 or 14 days, using one camera trap/waterhole.

  2. Provide artificial refuges/breeding sites

    A replicated study in 2007–2009 in six agroforestry sites in Alentejo and Algarve, Portugal (Loureiro et al. 2011) found that European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus used most available artificial shelters. European rabbits used 65 out of 100 artificial shelters. Rabbit numbers were higher in areas where a higher percentage of artificial shelters were used (data presented as correlation). Between 2007 and 2009, a total of 100 artificial shelters were constructed across six agroforestry estates dominated by cork oak Quercus suber. Artificial shelters were clustered in groups of 6–8. Each shelter had six entrance points but no more details about shelters were provided. Shelters were surveyed once every three months during the first year after construction and once every six months thereafter. Shelters were considered in use if pellets were detected near their entrances. Rabbit relative abundance was assessed by the density of pellets within a 300-m radius around the shelter.

  3. Provide supplementary food to increase reproduction/survival

    A replicated study in 2007–2009 in six agroforestry sites in Alentejo and Algarve, Portugal (Loureiro et al. 2011) found that European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus used most available artificial feeding stations. Rabbits used almost 70% of 48 feeding stations surveyed. Rabbit numbers were higher in areas where a higher proportion of feeding stations was used (data presented as a correlation). Over the course of the study, which included providing artificial shelters and waterholes, the number of rabbit latrines increased from 16 to 25 latrines/km (no statistical analysis conducted). Between July and September in 2008 and 2009, wheat, oat and alfalfa were made available through 120 artificial feeding stations in six agroforestry. Each station was protected by a fence, aimed at excluding large animals. However, 60% of feeding stations were destroyed by deer or wild boar, so data for 48 feeding stations were analysed. These were surveyed monthly and considered to be used if rabbit droppings were detected. Rabbit abundance was estimated based on the number of latrines/km counted along paths at each site.

Output references

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