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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Immediate post-release survival of eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii at Woodlands Historic Park, Victoria, with reference to fox activity

Published source details

Long K., Robley A.J. & Lovett K. (2005) Immediate post-release survival of eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii at Woodlands Historic Park, Victoria, with reference to fox activity. Australian Mammalogy, 27, 17-25


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2001 in a grassy woodland site in Melbourne, Australia (Long et al. 2005) found that following control of red foxes Vulpes vulpes, and release of captive-bred animals, most eastern barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii survived for at least five weeks. After five weeks, seven of 10 released bandicoots were known to be alive. Despite control, red foxes were recorded in all monitoring locations. In May 2001, poison-laced baits were buried at 28 locations, 180 m apart, in an effort to control red foxes. In July 2001, ten captive-bred eastern barred bandicoots were released into a 400-ha reserve. To monitor bandicoot survival, 180 live traps, baited with oats, peanut butter and honey, were distributed over a 9-ha area. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions over a five-week period, with traps set for two consecutive days each time and with two to four days between trapping. Twenty-nine 1-m2 pads, covered in sand, were placed close to vehicle tracks and the presence of fox prints was recorded every weekday, in March–August 2001.

(Summarised by Phil Martin)