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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Sustainably harvesting a large carnivore? Development of Eurasian lynx populations in Norway during 160 years of shifting policy

Published source details

Linnell J.D.C., Broseth H., Odden J. & Nilsen E.B. (2010) Sustainably harvesting a large carnivore? Development of Eurasian lynx populations in Norway during 160 years of shifting policy. Environmental Management, 45, 1142-1154


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Set hunting quotas based on target species population trends Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996–2008 in primarily forested areas in Norway (Linnell et al. 2010) found that adaptive management, including basing hunting quotas on population trends, enabled Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx populations to recover after a population decline. Three years after modification of hunting quotas, the population of Lynx was higher (453 animals) than prior to modifications (259 animals). Before modifications of quotas, lynx populations had dropped from 411–486 to 259 over an eight-year period. Lynx harvests were uncapped up to 1992. From 1994, responsibility for setting hunting quotas was devolved to 18 counties and then transferred to eight regional units in 2005. The number of lynx family groups was estimated by collating records of lynx tracks along with records of young animals found dead or killed by vehicles or hunters. These data were extrapolated to form overall population estimates for 1996–2008.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)