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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of aversive conditioning on behavior of nuisance Louisiana black bears

Published source details

Leigh J. & Chamberlain M.J. (2008) Effects of aversive conditioning on behavior of nuisance Louisiana black bears. Human-Wildlife Conflicts, 2, 175-182


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Scare or otherwise deter mammals from human-occupied areas to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2005–2006 at a site comprising marsh, forest, farmland, and residential areas in Louisiana, USA (Leigh & Chamberlain 2008) found that chasing nuisance black bears Ursus americanus with dogs Canis lupus familiaris, in addition to making noise and shooting with rubber buckshot, increased the amount of time until they next exhibited nuisance behaviour compared to solely making noise and shooting rubber buckshot. Black bears subjected to chasing by dogs, loud noise and shooting with rubber buckshot took longer to return to nuisance behaviour (58 days) than did bears that were subjected to loud noise and shooting with rubber buckshot but not chasing by dogs (48 days). Between April 2005 and July 2006, eleven bears reported to be exhibiting nuisance behaviour were live-trapped. All were immobilized and fitted with radio-collars. Upon release, six bears were subjected to loud noise, shooting with rubber buckshot and chasing with dogs and five were subjected to loud noise and shooting with rubber buckshot alone. Bears were monitored for recurring nuisance behaviour for up to 5 months after release.

(Summarised by Rose Hinson)