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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocation of mala (Lagorchestes hirsutus) from the Tanami desert, Northern Territory to Trimouille Island, Western Australia

Published source details

Langford D. & Burbidge A.A. (2001) Translocation of mala (Lagorchestes hirsutus) from the Tanami desert, Northern Territory to Trimouille Island, Western Australia. Australian Mammalogy, 23, 37-46


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals to islands without invasive predators Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1998–2001 on an offshore island dominated by grassland in Western Australia, Australia (Langford & Burbidge 2001) found that following release on an island without non-native predators, most captive-bred rufous hare-wallabies (‘mala’) Lagorchestes hirsutus survived over one year after release and some reproduced. Twenty-four (80%) of 30 rufous hare-wallabies survived at least one year after release. Rufous hare-wallabies were still present on the island three years post-release and animals had reproduced in the wild. In June 1998, thirty captive-bred rufous hare-wallabies from a captive colony were released on to a 520-ha predator-free island, part of the Montebello Islands Conservation Park. Animals were transported in 5 × 3 m holding pens and were ear-tagged and fitted with a radio-collar before release. Hare-wallabies were released within 20 hours of capture and fruit, alfalfa and water were made available to them immediately after release. They were monitored every two days for 10 days and intermittently for up to three years post-release.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)