Study

Long-range homing by an adult female black bear, Ursus americanus

  • Published source details Landriault L., Hall M., Hamr J. & Mallory F. (2006) Long-range homing by an adult female black bear, Ursus americanus. The Canadian Field-Naturalist, 120, 57-60.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate problem mammals away from residential areas (e.g. habituated bears) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

    A study in 1994–1997 of extensive forest and a residential area in Ontario, Canada (Landriault et al. 2006) found that repeated translocation of an adult female black bear Ursus americanus that habitually fed from garbage containers did not prevent it from returning and resuming nuisance behaviour at the capture site. The bear was translocated six times, over distances of 40–389 km (average 152 km), and returned each time to the initial capture area. On two of the returns to the capture area, the bear was accompanied by cubs. The maximum distance between any two capture sites was 10 km. The bear habitually foraged at unsecured garbage containers in residential areas. It was caught and translocated six times between June 1994 (when estimated to be nine years old) and 1997. It was ear-tagged at first capture and radio-collared at the time of the second capture and translocation.

    (Summarised by: Kailen Malloy)

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