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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The reintroduction of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) into the Netherlands: hidden life revealed by noninvasive genetic monitoring

Published source details

Koelewijn H., Perez-Haro M., Jansman H.A.H., Boerwinkel M.C., Bovenschen J., Lammertsma D.R., Niewold F.J.J. & Kuiters A.T. (2010) The reintroduction of the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) into the Netherlands: hidden life revealed by noninvasive genetic monitoring. Conservation Genetics, 11, 601-614


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2002–2008 in an area of peatland, fen, woodland, ditches and lakes in the Netherlands (Koelewijn et al. 2010) found that following release of captive-bred and translocated wild-born Eurasian otters Lutra lutra, the population grew. By the end of the study (1–6 years after releases), six of the released otters were known to be still alive. Fifty-four offspring from released otters or their descendants were detected during the course of the study. Most dead otters found were killed in collisions with road vehicles. Between July 2002 and November 2007, thirty otters were released. Thirteen were captive-bred and 17 were translocated, wild-caught animals. Monitoring was mostly by genetic analysis of otter spraints. A publicity campaign encouraged people to report dead otters that they found. These were examined to establish cause of death.

(Summarised by Alexandra Sutton )

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2002–2008 in an area of peatland, fen, woodland, ditches and lakes in the Netherlands (Koelewijn et al. 2010) found that after release of 30 translocated and captive-bred Eurasian otters Lutra lutra, at least six were still alive six years later and some had reproduced. Most dead otters recovered were killed in collisions with road vehicles. Fifty-four offspring from released otters or their descendants were detected. Between July 2002 and November 2007, thirty otters were released. Seventeen were translocated, wild-caught animals and 13 were captive-bred. A publicity campaign encouraged people to report dead otters that they found. These were then examined to establish cause of death.

(Summarised by Alexandra Sutton )