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Individual study: Sixteen years of eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii reintroductions in Victoria: a review

Published source details

Winnard A.L. & Coulson G. (2008) Sixteen years of eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii reintroductions in Victoria: a review. Pacific Conservation Biology, 14, 34-53


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use fencing to exclude predators or other problematic species Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of translocation studies in 1989–2005 in eight grassland and forest sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that translocated eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii populations released inside predator barrier-fencing persisted more successfully than did those translocated into unfenced areas. All three populations translocated into fenced areas persisted at the end of the study (1–26 years post-release). Only one out of five populations translocated to unfenced areas was known to persist at the end of the study (6–13 years post-release). Two populations were presumed extinct and the status was unclear, but with few recent records, at two other sites. Between 22 and 174 bandicoots were translocated into three fences sites (100–585 ha) and between 50 and 103 into five unfenced sites (85–500 ha) in 1989–2005. Translocated animals were both captive-bred and wild-born. Five sites had community involvement with the control of invasive red foxes Vulpes vulpes. Released bandicoots were provided with supplementary food for up to 10 days, in at least two sites. In most sites, bandicoots were monitored by trapping, but frequency and methods are not described.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of eight studies in 1989-2005 in eight grassland and woodland sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that three captive-bred eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii populations that were released into fenced areas with associated management survived between 1 and 15 years, animals were breeding and populations increased in size at least initially. In two studies, bandicoots were released into fenced areas and populations increased for at least five years after releases began and there was evidence of breeding and wild-born pouch young maturing to adults. These populations subsequently declined to low numbers 12-15 years after the original releases began. A further population released into a fenced area survived at least one year and both pouch young and wild-born adults were observed. Of five studies where bandicoots were not released into a fenced area, one population survived over at least seven years, two populations were extinct after five years, and two populations declined and management ceased (due to low detection rates) after 9-10 years. Between 22 and 207 bandicoots were released into three fenced areas (100-585 ha) and 50 to 103 bandicoots were released into unfenced areas (85-500 ha) in 1989-2005. All bandicoots were captive-bred. Bandicoots were released in stages in each site. Red fox Vulpes vulpes were controlled in all three fenced areas and four of five unfenced areas. Supplementary food was provided in two of the fenced areas (in one for 6-10 days after release, the other was not specified). In most sites, bandicoots were monitored by live-trapping but frequency and methods are not detailed.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of eight studies in 1989-2005 in eight grassland and woodland sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that in seven studies where red fox Vulpes vulpes control was carried out before or after the release of captive-bred eastern-barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii, survival rates of populations varied. In sites with fox control, two bandicoot populations increased for at least five years after releases began and there was evidence of breeding and wild-born pouch young maturing to adults. These populations subsequently declined to low numbers 12-15 years after the original releases began. A further population survived at least one year and both pouch young and wild-born adults were observed. However, two populations went extinct after five years, and two populations declined and management ceased (due to low detection rates) after 9-10 years. In a site without proactive fox control, released bandicoots survived and bred for at least seven years with the population comprising 74% wild-born offspring two years after releases began. Between 22 and 207 bandicoots were released into sites (85-585 ha) with fox control and 85 bandicoots were released a site with no proactive fox management (200 ha) in 1989-2005. Captive-bred bandicoots were released in stages in each site. Red fox Vulpes vulpes were controlled by shooting, use of 1080 poison bait, or a combination thereof before and/or after releases. In two sites with fox control, invasive European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were also culled. Supplementary food was provided in two sites with fox management (in one for 6-10 days after release, the other was not specified). In most sites, bandicoots were monitored by live-trapping but frequency and methods are not detailed.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Provide supplementary food during/after release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of eight studies in 1989-2005 in eight grassland and woodland sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that in two studies where captive-bred eastern-barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii were given supplementary food as part of a release program, the populations survived and bred in the wild, increasing for the first five years prior to declining. Two captive-bred bandicoot populations provided with supplementary food increased for at least five years after releases began and there was evidence of breeding and wild-born pouch young maturing to adults. These populations subsequently declined to low numbers 12-15 years after the original releases began. Between 174 and 207 bandicoots were released into 100-300 ha fenced predator-free enclosures in 1989-2004. Bandicoots were released in stages in each site. Supplementary food was provided in both sites (in one for 6-10 days after release, the other was not specified). Red fox Vulpes vulpes were controlled in both sites. Bandicoots were monitored by live-trapping but frequency and methods are not detailed.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A review of eight studies in 1989-2005 in eight grassland and woodland sites in Victoria, Australia (Winnard & Coulson 2008) found that in one study, released captive-bred eastern-barred bandicoots Perameles gunnii, some of which were placed in a holding pen prior to release, survived at least one year and bred. Captive-bred bandicoots, some of which were released into a holding pen prior to release into the wild survived at least one year and both pouch young and wild-born adults were observed. In total 22 captive-bred bandicoots were released into a 585 ha fenced predator-free enclosure in 2004-2005. Initially four animals were placed in a 1 ha holding pen prior to release. The remaining released animals were not placed in a holding pen prior to release. Bandicoots were released in stages in each site. Red fox Vulpes vulpes were controlled. Bandicoots were monitored by live-trapping but frequency and methods are not detailed.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)