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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Seasonal home range and habitat use of a critically endangered marsupial (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) inside and outside a predator-proof sanctuary

Published source details

Yeatman G.J. & Wayne A.F. (2015) Seasonal home range and habitat use of a critically endangered marsupial (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) inside and outside a predator-proof sanctuary. Australian Mammalogy, 37, 157-163


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A site comparison study in 2010–2011 of forest at two sites in Western Australia, Australia (Yeatman & Wayne 2015) found that following translocation into a predator-free, enclosed sanctuary, woylies Bettongia penicillata developed home ranges similar in size to those of an established population outside the enclosure. Home ranges did not differ significantly in size between woylies inside the enclosure (28–115 ha) and those in a population outside the enclosure (42–141 ha). The 423-ha sanctuary area was enclosed by a 2-m-high fence in September 2010. This was followed by an intensive cat Felis catus and fox Vulpes vulpes eradication programme. In December 2010, forty-one woylies sourced from nearby populations were released inside the fence. Eight woylies inside the fence (four male, four female) and seven from an established population 17 km to the north (five male, two female), were monitored by radio-tracking at night in March–April 2011.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)