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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Logging residues conserve small mammalian diversity in a Malaysian production forest

Published source details

Yamada T., Yoshida S., Hosaka T. & Okuda T. (2016) Logging residues conserve small mammalian diversity in a Malaysian production forest. Biological Conservation, 194, 100-104


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Leave coarse woody debris in forests Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2013 of a tropical forest in Malaysia (Yamada et al. 2016) found more small mammal species groups, but not individual small mammals, where woody debris was left after selective logging than in areas lacking woody debris. On average, six small mammal species groups were recorded at sites with debris compared to four at sites without. No significant difference was detected for average numbers of small mammal recorded at sites with debris (43) compared to sites without (39). Sites were compared with respect to tree density, canopy openness, understorey vegetation cover, distance to road and slope and no differences in these measures were detected between sites with and without debris. Trees were selectively logged, within a 200-ha area, in 2010–2011. Single camera traps were set, around two years later, for 10 days each at 17 locations with logging woody debris and 17 without. Camera locations were ≥50 m from logging roads and were baited.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)