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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Reproductive biology and life history traits of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) founder females reintroduced to Mahazat as-Sayd, Saudi Arabia

Published source details

Wronskia T., Lerp H. & Ismail K. (2011) Reproductive biology and life history traits of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) founder females reintroduced to Mahazat as-Sayd, Saudi Arabia. Mammalian Biology, 76, 506-511


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1990–2007 in a desert reserve in west-central Saudi Arabia (Wronski et al. 2011) found that released captive-bred female Arabian oryx Oryx leucoryx survived more than 10 years and successfully reproduced, regardless of prior breeding experience. Released captive-bred female oryx lived 11-12 years in the wild. Average birth rates were similar for ’experienced’ females that had given birth prior to release (0.69 calves/year) and ‘inexperienced’ females that had not (0.74 calves/year). Between 1990 and 1994, a total of 76 captive-bred oryx were released, of which 36 were females aged 0.5-8.9 years (numbers of experienced/inexperienced mothers not specified). Animals were identified by collars, ear-tags or ear notches. Individuals were located at least once every two weeks until 2007.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)