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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Potential competition for nest boxes between feral honeybees and sugar gliders at Tower Hill State Game Reserve

Published source details

Wood M.S. & Wallis R.L. (1998) Potential competition for nest boxes between feral honeybees and sugar gliders at Tower Hill State Game Reserve. The Victorian Naturalist, 115, 78-80


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals into area with artificial refuges/breeding sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1996 of a forest in Victoria, Australia (Wood & Wallis 1998) found that nest boxes were used by a population of released captive-bred sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps. Twenty out of 67 nest boxes were occupied by sugar gliders. Additionally, 18 boxes were occupied by feral honeybees Apis mellifera, a potential competitor for use of boxes. Boxes used by sugar gliders were positioned higher (average 4.5 m) than boxes used by honeybees (average 3.5 m). The site was formerly logged and had subsequently been replanted. Sixty-seven boxes were inspected in July 1996. Boxes had been installed, and captive-bred sugar gliders released in 1979–1982. Boxes were 10–27 l in capacity. Fifty-three boxes were positioned 3–5 m above ground. Seven were >5 m high and seven were <3m high, including three that had fallen to the ground.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)