Study

Two unsuccessful reintroduction attempts of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis) into a reserve in the KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa

  • Published source details Wimberger K., Downs C.T. & Perrin M.R. (2009) Two unsuccessful reintroduction attempts of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis) into a reserve in the KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. South African Journal of Wildlife Research, 39, 192-201

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals into area with artificial refuges/breeding sites

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Provide supplementary food during/after release of translocated mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals into area with artificial refuges/breeding sites

    A study in 2005–2006 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009) found that translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis that were provided with an artificial refuge and food after release in a social group, having been held in captivity, all died (or were presumed to have died) within 87 days of release. Eighty-seven days after the release of 17 hyraxes, none could be relocated. In July 2005, ten adult hyraxes were caught in baited mammal traps (900 × 310 × 320 mm) in an area where they were abundant, and held in captivity for 16 months, during which time three died. The remaining seven were released in November 2006, along with the eight juveniles and two pups born to them in captivity, to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. For four months prior to release, the group was housed together in an outdoor cage (5.9 × 2.5 × 3.2 m). Hyraxes were released into a hay-filled hutch which was left in place for several months, and were provided with cabbage for one week after release. Hyraxes were monitored by direct observations and by walking regular transects, daily for the first week but decreasing to monthly by the end of the study.

  2. Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release

    A study in 2005–2006 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009) found that translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis that were held in captivity before release in a social group, and provided with an artificial refuge and supplementary food after release, all died (or were presumed to have died) within 87 days of release. Eighty-seven days after the release of 17 hyraxes, none could be relocated. In July 2005, ten adult hyraxes were caught in baited mammal traps (900 × 310 × 320 mm), and held in captivity for 16 months, during which time three died. The remaining seven were released in November 2006, along with the eight juveniles and two pups born to them in captivity, to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. For four months prior to release, the group was housed together in an outdoor cage (5.9 × 2.5 × 3.2 m). Hyraxes were released into a hay-filled hutch which was left in place for several months, and were provided with cabbage for one week after release. Hyraxes were monitored by direct observations and by walking regular transects, daily for the first week decreasing to monthly by the end of the study.

  3. Provide supplementary food during/after release of translocated mammals

    A study in 2005–2006 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009) found that translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis that were provided with food and an artificial refuge after release in a social group, having been held in captivity, all died (or were presumed to have died) within 87 days of release. Eighty-seven days after the release of 17 hyraxes, none could be relocated. In July 2005, ten adult hyraxes were caught in baited mammal traps (900 × 310 × 320 mm) in an area where they were abundant, and held in captivity for 16 months, during which time three died. The remaining seven were released in November 2006, along with the eight juveniles and two pups born to them in captivity, to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. For four months prior to release, the group was housed together in an outdoor cage (5.9 × 2.5 × 3.2 m). Hyraxes were released into a hay-filled hutch which was left in place for several months, and were provided with cabbage for one week after release. Hyraxes were monitored by direct observations and by walking regular transects, daily for the first week but decreasing to monthly by the end of the study.

  4. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A study in 2007 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009a) found that all translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis that were released as a group, having been kept in a holding pen, died (or were presumed to have died) within 18 days of release. Eight of nine wild translocated hyraxes died within 18 days of release and the other was presumed to have died. The group split up and were not seen together after release. In October 2007, nine hyraxes (one juvenile, three sub-adults and five adults) were caught in baited mammal traps (90 × 31 × 32 cm) in an area where they were abundant, and moved 150 km to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. Hyraxes were kept together in a holding cage (185 × 185 × 185 cm) for 14 days before release. They were monitored daily for one week, and then every few days by direct observation and radio-tracking.

  5. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A study in 2005–2006 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009b) found that translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis that were released in a social group after being held in captivity, and were provided with an artificial refuge and supplementary food after release, all died (or were presumed to have died) within 87 days of release. Eighty-seven days after the release of 17 hyraxes, none could be relocated. In July 2005, ten adult hyraxes were caught in baited mammal traps (90 × 31 × 32 cm) in an area where they were abundant, and held in captivity for 16 months, during which time three died. The remaining seven were released in November 2006, along with the eight juveniles and two pups born to them in captivity, to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. For four months prior to release, the group was housed together in an outdoor cage (5.9 × 2.5 × 3.2 m). Hyraxes were released into a hay-filled hutch which was left in place for several months, and were provided with cabbage for one week after release. Hyraxes were monitored by direct observations and by walking regular transects, daily for the first week but decreasing to monthly by the end of the study.

  6. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

    A study in 2007 at rocky outcrops on a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (Wimberger et al. 2009) found that all translocated rock hyraxes Procavia capensis kept in a holding pen and released as a group died (or were presumed to have died) within 18 days of release. Eight of nine wild translocated hyraxes died within 18 days of release and the other was presumed to have died. The group split up and were not seen together after release. In October 2007, nine hyraxes (one juvenile, three sub-adults and five adults) were caught in baited mammal traps (900 × 310 × 320 mm) in an area where they were abundant, and moved 150 km to a 656-ha reserve where the species was nearly extinct. Hyraxes were kept together in a holding cage (1850 × 1,850 × 1850 mm) for 14 days before release. They were monitored daily for one week, and then every few days by direct observation and radio-tracking.

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 17

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust