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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Using canopy bridges to link habitat for arboreal mammals: successful trials in the wet tropics of Queensland

Published source details

Weston N., Goosem M., Marsh H., Cohen M. & Wilson R. (2011) Using canopy bridges to link habitat for arboreal mammals: successful trials in the wet tropics of Queensland. Australian Mammalogy, 33, 93-105


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install rope bridges between canopies Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2000–2010 of four roads through rainforest in Queensland, Australia (Weston et al. 2011) found that all seven rope bridges connecting trees at each side of the road were used and nine mammal species in total were recorded. Of these, five species were directly observed crossing bridges. The remaining four were detected solely by other monitoring methods. Totals of 2–7 species/rope bridge were recorded. No mammals were found dead on roads in the vicinity of rope bridges (though details of searches for casualties are not stated). Seven rope bridges in total were erected at four sites in 1995–2005. Two were rope tunnels, with a square cross-section. The remainder were rope ladders, 0.25–0.5 m wide. Mammal use of bridges was monitored by direct observation by spotlight, faeces collected in nets or funnels below bridges, motion- and heat-sensitive cameras and hair collection using sticky tape.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)