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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Monitoring for adaptive management in a trial reintroduction of the black-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale lateralis

Published source details

West R., Read J.L., Ward M.J., Foster W.K. & Taggart D.A. (2017) Monitoring for adaptive management in a trial reintroduction of the black-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale lateralis. Oryx, 51, 554-563


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary water to increase reproduction/survival Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 in a semi-arid area in South Australia (West et al. 2017) found that over half of released captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies Petrogale lateralis provided with supplementary water after being released into a large predator-free fenced area survived for at least two years and most females reproduced. Ten (five males, five females) of 16 rock-wallabies (63%) survived more than two years after being released. All five females that survived reproduced within 2–6 months of release. Over three years, 28 births from nine females were recorded. Between March 2011 and July 2012, sixteen captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies (eight males, eight females; 1–5 years old) were released in three groups into a 97-ha fenced area. Ten of the 16 rock-wallabies were wild-born and fostered by yellow-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale xanthopus surrogate mothers in captivity. Introduced predators, common wallaroos Macropus robustus and European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were removed from the enclosure. Supplementary water was provided in five 8-l tanks that were monitored with camera traps in 2011–2014. Rock-wallabies were fitted with radio-collars and tracked 1–7 times/week in 2011–2014. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions in 2011–2014.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 in a semi-arid area in South Australia, Australia (West et al. 2017) found that over half of captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies Petrogale lateralis released into a large fenced area survived at least 20 months and most females reproduced. Ten (five males, five females) of 16 captive-raised black-footed rock-wallabies (63%) survived at least 20 months after release into a fenced area. All five females that survived reproduced within 2-6 months of release. Over three years, 28 births from nine females were recorded. Between March 2011 and July 2012, sixteen captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies (eight males, eight females; 1-5 years old) were released into a 97-ha fenced area. The fence included a floppy overhang to deter predator entry. Ten of the 16 black-footed rock-wallabies were wild-born and fostered by yellow-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale xanthopus surrogate mothers in captivity. Introduced predators, common wallaroos Macropus robustus and European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were removed from the enclosure by September 2012. Supplementary water was provided in five 8-l tanks that were monitored with camera traps in 2011–2014. Wallabies were fitted with radio-collars and tracked 1-7times/week in 2011-2014. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions in 2011-2014.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2011–2014 in a semi-arid area in South Australia (22) found that over half of captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies Petrogale lateralis released into a large predator-free fenced area survived for at least two years and most females reproduced. Ten (five males, five females) of 16 rock-wallabies (63%) survived more than two years after being released. All five females that survived reproduced within 2–6 months of release. Over three years, 28 births from nine females were recorded. Between March 2011 and July 2012, sixteen captive-reared black-footed rock-wallabies (eight males, eight females; 1–5 years old) were released in three groups into a 97-ha fenced area. Ten of the 16 rock-wallabies were wild-born and fostered by yellow-footed rock-wallaby Petrogale xanthopus surrogate mothers in captivity. Introduced predators, common wallaroos Macropus robustus and European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were removed from the enclosure. Supplementary water was provided in five 8-l tanks that were monitored with camera traps in 2011–2014. Rock-wallabies were fitted with radio-collars and tracked 1–7 times/week in 2011–2014. Trapping was carried out on seven occasions in 2011–2014.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)