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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Is translocation of stock-raiding leopards into a protected area with resident conspecifics an effective management tool?

Published source details

Weilenmann M., Gusset M., Mills D.R., Gabanapelo T. & Schiess-Meier M. (2010) Is translocation of stock-raiding leopards into a protected area with resident conspecifics an effective management tool? Wildlife Research, 37, 702-707


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate predators away from livestock to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 2001–2008 on two savanna game reserves in Botswana (Weilenmann et al. 2010) found that following translocation of four leopards Panthera pardus involved in livestock predation, three did not survive more than six months after release. Of four stock-raiding leopards translocated to a protected area, three were shot within six months, having left the release area and resumed livestock predation. The fourth animal returned to, and settled back within, its initial capture area. By comparison, four leopards resident within the protected area had stable home ranges. Four leopards (three male and one female), which were suspected of predating livestock, were released in a protected area, 33–158 km from capture sites. These animals, and four leopards resident in the protected area (one male, three female), were monitored by a combination of radio- and satellite-tracking between April 2001 and March 2008, for between 23 days and 53 months.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)