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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Factors affecting settling, survival, and viability of black bears reintroduced to Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas

Published source details

Wear B.J., Eastridge R. & Clark J.D. (2005) Factors affecting settling, survival, and viability of black bears reintroduced to Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 33, 1363-1374


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals into area with artificial refuges/breeding sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2000–2003 in temperate forest in a wildlife refuge in Arkansas, USA (Wear et al. 2005) found that most translocated black bears Ursus americanus released into man-made dens survived at least one year after release. The first-year post-release survival rate for translocated adult female bears was 62%. For those surviving >1 year after release, second-year survival was 91%. The first-year survival rate of translocated cubs was 75%. Of eight documented adult female mortalities, at least three were due to poaching. Four bears returned to their capture site. In March 2000–April 2002, twenty-three wild adult female black bears and their 54 cubs were captured in White River National Wildlife Refuge and released, 160 km away, into man-made dens at Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge. Radio-telemetry was used track bears and gather movement data weekly, through to January 2003.

(Summarised by Casey Johnson)