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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A successful reintroduction of European otters

Published source details

Wayre P. (1985) A successful reintroduction of European otters. Oryx, 19, 137-139


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in summer 1983–1984 at a riparian site in East Anglia, UK (Wayre 1985) found that captive-bred European otters Lutra lutra kept in a pre-release pen and provided supplementary food after release bred successfully. Footprints of at least one otter cub were found in the year after release. Otters settled near the release site, but ranged along 31.5 km of river over the first 100 days after release. In July 1983, three 18-month-old captive-bred otters (one male, two female) were released. Before release, they were held together in a pen at the release site, for an unspecified period of time. After release, supplementary food was provided in the pens for 12 days. The male otter was radio-tracked for 50 nights after release. Local bridges were monitored for 100 days after release for signs of otter faeces.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )

Provide supplementary food during/after release of captive-bred mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in summer 1983–1984 at a riparian site in East Anglia, UK (Wayre 1985) found that captive-bred European otters Lutra lutra provided with supplementary food after being kept in a pre-release pen bred successfully following release. Footprints of at least one otter cub were found in the year after release. Otters settled near the release site, but ranged along 32 km of river over the first 100 days after release. In July 1983, three 18-month-old captive-bred otters (one male, two female) were released. Before release, they were held together in a pen at the release site, for an unspecified period of time. After release, supplementary food was provided in the pens for 12 days. The male otter was radio-tracked for 50 nights after release. Local bridges were monitored for 100 days after release for signs of otter faeces.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )