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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocating lions into an inbred lion population in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

Published source details

Trinkel M., Ferguson N., Reid A., Reid C., Somers M., Turelli L., Graf J., Szykman M., Cooper D., Haverman P., Kastberger G., Packer C. & Slotow R. (2008) Translocating lions into an inbred lion population in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa. Animal Conservation, 11, 138-143


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1999–2004 in three mixed savanna and woodland sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (Trinkel et al. 2008) found that after translocation to a fenced reserve with holding pens, survival of released lions Panthera leo was higher than that of resident lions, and translocated animals reproduced successfully. No statistical tests were performed. After five years, a higher proportion of translocated animals survived (eight of 16 animals, 50%) than of resident animals (20 of 84 animals, 24%). Seven translocated females reproduced successfully. Between August 1999 and January 2001, sixteen lions were translocated to an enclosed reserve to improve genetic diversity. They were held at release sites in 0.5–1-ha pens for 4–6 weeks before release. Nine translocated lions were fitted with radio-collars. From August 1999 to December 2004, translocated animals were located at least every 10 days. Resident lions were also tracked at least every 10 days.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 1999–2004 in three mixed savanna and woodland sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (Trinkel et al. 2008) found that after translocation to a fenced reserve with holding pens, survival of released lions Panthera leo was higher than that of resident lions, and that translocated animals reproduced successfully. No statistical tests were performed. After five years, a higher proportion of introduced animals survived (eight of 16 animals, 50%) than of resident animals (20 of 84 animals, 24%). Seven translocated females reproduced successfully. Between August 1999 and January 2001, sixteen lions were translocated to an enclosed reserve to improve genetic diversity. They were held at release sites in 0.5–1.0-ha pens for 4–6 weeks before release. Nine translocated lions were fitted with radio-collars. From August 1999 to December 2004, translocated animals were located at least every 10 days. Resident lions were also tracked at least every 10 days.

(Summarised by Laura Bennett )