Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Brown bear reintroduction in the Southern Alps: To what extent are expectations being met?

Published source details

Tosi G., Chirichella R., Zibordi F., Mustoni A., Giovannini R., Groff C., Zanin M. & Apollonio M. (2015) Brown bear reintroduction in the Southern Alps: To what extent are expectations being met? Journal for Nature Conservation, 26, 9-19


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1999–2012 of woodland in and around a national park in Italy (Tosi et al. 2015) found that, following the start of translocations, a re-established brown bear Ursus arctos population increased steadily in numbers over 12 years. From 10 bears translocated to the area in 1999–2001, the population grew by 20% annually in 2002–2006, with the rate gradually falling to 16% annual growth by 2012. Breeding was first recorded in 2002, with ≥74 cubs born in ≥34 reproductive events up to 2012. At that point, there were 47 bears in the population (16 adults, 14 juveniles and 17 cubs). Ten bears (seven female, three male) were translocated from Slovenia in 1999–2001. Up to 2012, twenty-one young males had dispersed from the province (though six subsequently returned). Other documented population losses included those attributed to illegal hunting, road casualties and removal of problem bears.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)