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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Behavioral responses of bobcats and coyotes to habitat fragmentation and corridors in an urban environment

Published source details

Tigas L.A., Van Vuren D.H. & Sauvajot R.M. (2002) Behavioral responses of bobcats and coyotes to habitat fragmentation and corridors in an urban environment. Biological Conservation, 108, 299-306


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install tunnels/culverts/underpass under roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1998–1999 in a fragmented urban area in California, USA (Tigas et al. 2002) found that bobcats Felis rufus and coyotes Canis latrans used underpasses to cross a road. Nine road crossings (two by bobcats and seven by coyotes) out of 24 crossings where culverts were available within 100 m were through culverts and 15 (five by bobcats and 10 by coyotes) were over the road. Traffic levels were higher during crossings through culverts (2.1 cars/minute) than during crossings over the road (0.8 cars/minute). Results were not tested for statistical significance. The study was conducted northwest of Los Angeles from July 1998 to October 1999. Movements of 13 bobcats and nine coyotes were determined from 53 radio-tracking sessions (32 focussed on bobcats, 21 on coyotes). Locations were obtained every 30 minutes for 2–12 hours and road crossings were observed directly when possible.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)