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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Early and late colonizers in mine site rehabilitated waste dumps in the goldfields of Western Australia

Published source details

Thompson G.G. & Thompson S.A. (2007) Early and late colonizers in mine site rehabilitated waste dumps in the goldfields of Western Australia. Pacific Conservation Biology, 13, 235-243


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore former mining sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, paired sites, site comparison study in 2000–2004 of five former mines and adjacent scrubland vegetation in Western Australia, Australia (Thompson & Thompson 2007) found that mines undergoing restoration contained all small mammal species recorded on adjacent unmined land and higher overall abundance of small mammals. Results were not tested for statistical significance. Seven species were recorded in both restored mines and in adjacent unmined land. Three other species were only recorded in restored mines. In total, 211–493 mammals/site were caught in restored mines and 91–131 mammals/site were caught on unmined land. Five mines, which had been under restoration management for three to nine years, were studied along with adjacent unmined land. From June 2000 to January 2004, sampling was carried out 12 times on each of four sites and seven times on the fifth. Animals were sampled using pitfall traps or funnels along drift fences, for seven days (14 days on the final sample visit).

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)