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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Mammals or reptiles, as surveyed by pittraps, as bio-indicators of rehabilitation success for mine sites in the Goldfields region of Western Australia?

Published source details

Thompson G.G. & Thompson S.A. (2005) Mammals or reptiles, as surveyed by pittraps, as bio-indicators of rehabilitation success for mine sites in the Goldfields region of Western Australia? Pacific Conservation Biology, 11, 268-286


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore former mining sites Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2000–2002 of woodland and scrub at five mines in Western Australia, Australia (Thompson & Thompson 2005) found that restored sites had a similar mammal species richness compared to unmined sites. The average number of species/site/month in restored sites (2–4) was similar to that in unmined sites (2–5). The overall number of mammal species recorded/site was also similar (restored: 5–8; unmined: 4–7). Five former mine site waste dumps, where restoration had started 3–9 years previously, and an unmined area adjacent to each dump were sampled. At four mines, pit-traps and drift fencing were used to sample sites over a seven-day period, on 10 occasions, from spring 2000 to winter 2002. At one mine, sampling was carried out five times, from spring 2001 to winter 2002.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)