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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocation of a top-order carnivore: tracking the initial survival, spatial movement, home-range establishment and habitat use of Tasmanian devils on Maria Island

Published source details

Thalmann S., Peck S., Wise P., Potts J.M., Clarke J. & Richley J. (2016) Translocation of a top-order carnivore: tracking the initial survival, spatial movement, home-range establishment and habitat use of Tasmanian devils on Maria Island. Australian Mammalogy, 38, 68-79


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals to areas outside historical range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2012–2013 on an offshore island in Tasmania, Australia (Thalmann et al. 2016) found that most captive-bred Tasmanian devils Sarcophilus harrisii released into an area outside their native range survived over four months after release. Fourteen out of 15 captive-bred Tasmanian devils survived >4 months (122 days) after release. In November 2012, fifteen captive-bred Tasmanian devils were released onto a 9,650-ha island reserve, 12 km off the Tasmanian mainland. Seven individuals were from a captive breeding facility, where animals were raised in groups of 1–4 in 1-ha pens. Eight were from a captive breeding facility were animals were raised in groups of 20–25 in 22-ha enclosures. Animals that shared pens in captivity were released together. Supplementary wallaby meat (20 kg) was provided at two-week intervals. Tasmanian devils were monitored for 122 days through video footage obtained at feeding sites. Individuals were identified by unique markings and scars.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)