Study

Restoring connectivity in landscapes fragmented by major roads: a case study using wooden poles as "stepping stones" for gliding mammals

  • Published source details Taylor B.D. & Goldingay R.L. (2012) Restoring connectivity in landscapes fragmented by major roads: a case study using wooden poles as "stepping stones" for gliding mammals. Restoration Ecology, 20, 671-678.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Install pole crossings for gliders/flying squirrels

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Install rope bridges between canopies

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Install pole crossings for gliders/flying squirrels

    A replicated, site comparison study in 2006–2010 at four sites along two roads through forests in New South Wales and Queensland, Australia (Taylor & Goldingay 2012) found that glider poles along overpasses were used by squirrel gliders Petaurus norfolcensis for crossing roads. Gliders used glider poles along both overpasses where they were installed (detected on 30–66% of sample sessions). No gliders were detected in the middle of either overpass that did not have glider poles. Two overpasses (36–70 m long, 10–15 m wide, constructed in 2005–2008), each had eight glider poles installed. Poles were 6.5 m high and 5–12 m apart. Two further overpasses (62–66 m long, 19–37 m wide, constructed in 2002) had no poles. Between September 2006 and December 2010, gliders were surveyed 23–35 times at each site with poles, using hair-traps attached 1.8 m high on each pole. Overpasses without poles were surveyed 10 times, for 2–4 weeks each time, between May 2010 and June 2011, using six hair‐traps/overpass, mounted 1.8 m high on trees or shrubs.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  2. Install rope bridges between canopies

    A site comparison study in 2010–2011 at three overpasses along a road through forest in Queensland, Australia (Taylor & Goldingay 2012) found that squirrel gliders Petaurus norfolcensis, a brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula and a ringtail possum Pseudocheirus perigrinus used a rope bridge that connected between glider poles across the overpass. Squirrel gliders were detected using the rope bridge on 33 occasions during 27 of 166 survey nights. Over the same period, one brushtail possum and one ringtail possum were detected. No gliders crossed two overpasses that did not have glider poles or rope bridges. The study was conducted on an overpass (36 × 15 m, constructed in 2008) with eight glider poles, 6.5 m high, connected by a single rope (40 mm diameter). Two overpasses without poles or a rope bridge (62–66 m long, 19–37 m wide) were also monitored. Mammal crossings were surveyed using camera traps between September 2010 and April 2011. A camera was placed near the top of one end pole and directed along the connecting rope. Cameras were also placed in the middle of overpasses without poles.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

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