Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Influence of repeated fertilization on forest ecosystems: Relative habitat use by snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus)

Published source details

Sullivan T.P., Sullivan D.S., Lindgren P.M.F. & Ransome D.B. (2006) Influence of repeated fertilization on forest ecosystems: Relative habitat use by snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 36, 2080-2089


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Apply fertilizer to trees Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled study, in 1999–2003, of three lodgepole pine Pinus contorta forests in British Columbia, Canada (Sullivan et al. 2006, same experimental set-up as Sullivan et al. 2006 and Sullivan et al. 2010) found that adding fertilizer to thinned forest stands increased their use by snowshoe hares Lepus americanus in winter but not in summer. In winter, the average density of hare faecal pellets across fertilized stands (7,000–62,000/ha) was higher than that across unfertilized stands (1,400–28,000/ha). In summer, there was no significant difference in the density of hare faecal pellets between fertilized stands (800–21,000/ha) and unfertilized stands (600–11,000/ha). Within each of three site, blocks of commercially grown lodgepole pines were thinned to 2,000, 1,000, 500 and 250 stems/ha in 1993. Half of each stand was fertilized five times in 1994–2003. Hare faecal pellets on 5-m2 permanent plots were counted in summer (May–September) and winter (October–April) 1999–2003.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)