Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) to windrows of woody debris along forest-clearcut edges

Published source details

Sullivan T.P. & Sullivan D.S. (2014) Responses of red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) to windrows of woody debris along forest-clearcut edges. Wildlife Research, 41, 212-221


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Retain wildlife corridors in logged areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in 2010–2012 of forest at three sites in British Colombia, Canada (Sullivan & Sullivan 2014) found that following tree harvesting, rows of woody debris connected to adjacent forest were not used more by red-backed voles Myodes gapperi than were isolated rows of woody debris. The average number of voles/trapping session in rows of woody debris attached to forest (9.0) did not differ from the number in those that were isolated (9.3). However, both had more voles than did unharvested forest (4.4). Seventeen plots were spread across three sites of 42–47 ha extent. Eight plots contained rows of woody debris attached to forest edge, six had isolated woody debris rows in clearcut areas and three were unharvested mature or old-growth forest. Plots averaged 0.23–0.40 km apart. Rows of woody debris averaged 136–344 m long, 1–3 m high and 6–9 m diameter or width. Felling and establishment of rows of woody debris occurred in autumn 2009. Voles were sampled using Longworth live traps, at 4-week intervals (two sites) or 4–8-week intervals (one site), from May to October 2010–2012. Traps were set for one day and two nights each time.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)