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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Same-site multiple releases of translocated white rhinoceroses Ceratotherium simum may increase the risk of unwanted dispersal

Published source details

Støen O.-G., Pitlagano M.L. & Moe S.R. (2009) Same-site multiple releases of translocated white rhinoceroses Ceratotherium simum may increase the risk of unwanted dispersal. Oryx, 43, 580-585


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2001–2006 on grassland in a national park in Botswana (Støen et al. 2009) found that most translocated white rhinoceros Ceratotherium simum released in groups survived at least three years after release, but some dispersed away from the park when released into areas already occupied by released animals. Of 32 rhinoceroses released into the park in four batches during just over two years, five died soon after release and 21 remained in the park through to three years after the final release. Six (all females) left the park. All were from the final release. The authors suggest that this may be because suitable habitat close to the release site was already occupied by previously released animals. Rhinoceroses, sourced from protected sanctuaries, were all released from the same boma, in four batches, from November 2001 to November 2003. They were monitored by radio-tracking from a vehicle or aircraft, through to 2006.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)