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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Predation by feral cats key to the failure of a long-term reintroduction of the western barred bandicoot (Perameles bougainville)

Published source details

Short J. (2016) Predation by feral cats key to the failure of a long-term reintroduction of the western barred bandicoot (Perameles bougainville). Wildlife Research, 43, 38-50


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use fencing to exclude predators or other problematic species Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1995–2010 on a shrubland-dominated peninsula in Western Australia, Australia (Short 2016) found that a translocated population of western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville did not persist despite fencing to exclude invasive red foxes Vulpes vulpes and cats Felis catus. Nine years after being translocated into a fenced area, bandicoot numbers increased to an estimated 467 but over the next three years, the population fell to zero. Fourteen bandicoots were initially translocated in 1995–1996 from an offshore island to a 17-ha enclosure within a 1,200-ha section of a mainland peninsula, fenced to exclude foxes and feral cats. The peninsular fence was built in 1989 and despite being rebuilt and repaired several times, it was never an effective barrier to foxes and cats. Throughout the study period, foxes and cats were controlled inside the fenced area by baiting (using 1080 poison) and cats were also trapped and shot. Starting in May 1997 and over 10 years, 82 bandicoots were released from the enclosure to the fenced peninsula. Bandicoots were monitored along a 40 km track network, with cage traps set at 100-m intervals over two nights each three months from August 1995-October 2002 and then twice/year until September 2010 (25,000 trap-nights).

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1995–2010 in a shrubland-dominated peninsula in Western Australia, Australia (Short 2016) found that a translocated population of western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville released inside a predator-resistant fence did not persist. Nine years after translocations into a fenced area commenced, bandicoot numbers increased to 467, from 82 founders. However, then declined to four individuals eight months later and just one animal was recorded over the following three years. Fourteen bandicoots were translocated in 1995–1996 from an offshore island to a 17-ha enclosure, within a 1,200-ha section of a mainland peninsula, fenced to exclude foxes and feral cats. In 1997–2004, eighty-two bandicoots were released from the enclosure to the fenced peninsula. Bandicoots were monitored with cage traps at 100-m intervals over two nights during 47 trapping sessions between August 1995 and September 2010. The fence was built in 1989 and was rebuilt and repaired several times. However, it was considered to be an ineffective barrier to red foxes Vulpes vulpes and cats Felis catus, which were controlled inside the fenced area by poisoning, trapping and shooting.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)