Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Evidence of long-term survival and reproduction by translocated River Otters, Lutra candensis

Published source details

Serfass T.L., Brooks R.P. & Rymon L.M. (1993) Evidence of long-term survival and reproduction by translocated River Otters, Lutra candensis. The Canadian Field-Naturalist, 107, 59-63


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated study in 1982–1991 at two riverine sites in Pennsylvania, USA (Serfass et al. 1993) found that translocated river otters Lutra canadensis released in areas with no existing otters settled and reproduced in the 6.5–8 years after release. Otter scats were widely found in both release areas, confirming continued otter presence. Two juveniles, live-trapped and released by hunters three years after translocations, provided evidence of breeding at one site. At the other site, four of seven otters killed by trappers, between three and seven years after translocations, were considered to be offspring of released animals. Twenty-two wild-caught otters (11 male, 11 female) were released in Pine Creek in 1983–1984 and four (two male, two female) were released in Kettle Creek in 1982. Follow-up monitoring of scats occurred in September–December 1990 (Pine Creek) and April 1991 (Kettle Creek). Additionally, carcasses were examined and trapping incidents reviewed.

(Summarised by Jack Gavigan)