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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Coyote hair as an area repellent for white-tailed deer

Published source details

Seamans T.W., Blackwell B.F. & Cepek J.D. (2002) Coyote hair as an area repellent for white-tailed deer. International Journal of Pest Management, 48, 301-306


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use predator scent to deter crop damage by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, before-and-after study in 2000–2001 in a forest in Ohio, USA (Seamans et al. 2002) found that coyote Canis latrans hair reduced feeding at troughs by white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus. With one bag of coyote hair/trough, deer consumed less corn (103 kg) than before bag placement (246 kg). With three bags of coyote hair/trough, deer consumed less corn (46–108 kg/week) than in the week before bag placement (323 kg). At control toughs with empty bags, operated concurrently to experimental troughs, consumption (284–425 kg/week) did not differ to that in the week before bag placement (247–265 kg/week). Ten troughs (≥1 km apart) were fenced on three sides and stocked with whole kernel corn. Five were treatment troughs and five were controls. Stage I (January–February 2000) entailed one week with unprotected troughs. The following week, a nylon mesh bag containing 17 g of coyote hair was placed touching the back of treatment troughs. An empty bag was placed at control troughs. Stage II (January–March 2001) had a similar pre-treatment week, then five weeks with three bags, each containing 16 g of coyote hair, in front of each treatment trough. Three empty bags were placed at each control trough.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)

Use predator scent to deter crop damage by mammals to reduce human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, randomized, controlled, before-and-after study in 2000 in a forest in Ohio, USA (Seamans et al. 2002) found that hanging bags of coyote Canis latrans hair did not reduce use of established trails by white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus. The number of deer using treatment trails did not differ significantly before (2.6 deer/day) or after (3.1 deer/day) placement of coyote hair bags. Similarly, the number of deer using non-treatment trails was not significantly different before (3.4 deer/day) or after (5.1 deer/day) placement of empty bags. Deer passes along 10 active trails (around 1 km apart) were recorded for three weeks (18 August to 8 September 2000) using infra-red monitors. A nylon mesh bag containing 16 g of coyote hair, was then suspended 2 m high from a tree along five randomly selected trails. Empty bags were hung at the other five trails. Monitoring continued for three further weeks (8–29 September 2000).

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)