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Individual study: Monitoring of reintroduced tigers in Sariska Tiger Reserve, Western India: preliminary findings on home range, prey selection and food habits

Published source details

Sankar K., Qureshi Q., Nigam P., Malik P.K., Sinha P.R., Mehrotra R.N., Gopal R., Bhattacharjee S., Mondal K. & Gupta S. (2010) Monitoring of reintroduced tigers in Sariska Tiger Reserve, Western India: preliminary findings on home range, prey selection and food habits. Tropical Conservation Science, 3, 301-318


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 2008–2009 in a subtropical forest in Rajasthan, India (Sankar et al. 2010) found that three translocated tigers Panthera tigris tigris that were kept in holding pens prior to release survived for at least 3–11 months after release and established home ranges. The annual home range of a released male was 169 km2 and that of a female was 181 km2. The summer home range of a later released female was 223 km2. Home ranges overlapped by 54–99 km2. Mating was observed between the male and each female. Of 115 recorded kills by tigers, 12 were of domestic animals. Thirty-two villages were located within the 881-km2 reserve. Tigers had been absent since 2004. One male and one female wild-caught tiger were released on 6 and 8 July 2008, respectively. A further female was released on 27 February 2009. Tigers were held in 1-ha enclosures at release sites for 2–8 days before release. They were satellite- and radio-tracked from release until June 2009.

(Summarised by Jack Gavigan )