Study

Reintroduction of greater Indian rhinoceros into Dudhwa National Park

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Hold translocated mammals in captivity before release

    A study in 1984–1986 in a national park in Uttar Pradesh, India (Sale & Singh 1987) found that most translocated greater Indian rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis that had been held in captivity before release into a fenced reserve, survived over 20 months after release. Seven of eight translocated rhinoceroses were still alive at least 20 months after release into a fenced reserve, and three of these animals survived for over 31 months. One elderly female died three months after release, due to a paralysed limb. In March 1984, six rhinoceroses were captured in Assam and housed in a pen for 9–19 days (during which one individual escaped). The remaining five were transported to Dudhwa National Park, where one elderly female died before release (following abortion of a dead foetus) and four were released in April–May 1984. Four other animals captured in late March 1985 in Sauraha (Nepal) were released to Dudhwa National Park one week after capture. Survival data were collated up to December 1986.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  2. Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 1984–1986 in a national park in Uttar Pradesh, India (Sale & Singh 1987) found that following translocation into a fenced reserve, most greater Indian rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis survived over 20 months after release. Seven of eight translocated rhinoceroses were still alive at least 20 months after release into a fenced reserve, and three of these animals had survived for over 31 months. One elderly female died three months after release, due to a paralysed limb. In March 1984, six rhinoceroses were captured in Assam. They were housed in a holding pen for 9–19 days (during which one individual escaped). The remaining five were transported to Dudhwa National Park, where one elderly female died before release (following abortion of a dead foetus) and four were released in April–May 1984. Four other animals captured in late March 1985 in Sauraha (Nepal) were released to Dudhwa National Park one week after capture. Survival data were collated up to December 1986.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

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