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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A systematic review of the effects on terrestrial invertebrates of reducing pesticide inputs in arable crop edges

Published source details

Frampton G.K. & Dorne J.L.C.M. (2007) The effects on terrestrial invertebrates of reducing pesticide inputs in arable crop edges: a meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Ecology, 44, 362-373


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce fertilizer, pesticide or herbicide use generally Farmland Conservation

A systematic review of 23 studies (Frampton & Dorne 2007) found that restricting herbicide inputs to crop edges tended to increase arthropod abundance. Studies mainly excluded or selectively used herbicides; studies excluding fungicides or insecticides separately were not available. Studies focused on ground beetles (Carabidae), true bugs (Heteroptera), rove beetles (Staphylinidae), butterflies (Lepidoptera) and grouped bird ‘chick-food’ insects. Abundance of true bugs was up to almost 13 times higher where herbicide use was restricted or where herbicides and fungicides or insecticides were restricted. For other invertebrates, restricted use generally increased abundance or had no impact. Only two species exhibited a significant decrease in abundance. In most (20 out of 23) studies, the possibility of confounding outcomes due to pesticide and fertilizer inputs could not be discounted.