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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Does diversionary feeding create nuisance bears and jeopardize public safety?

Published source details

Rogers L.L. (2011) Does diversionary feeding create nuisance bears and jeopardize public safety? Human Wildlife Interactions, 5, 287-295


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide diversionary feeding for mammals to reduce nuisance behaviour and human-wildlife conflict Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1981–1991 in an area of forest, residences and recreation facilities in Minnesota, USA (Rogers 2011) found that diversionary feeding reduced nuisance behaviour by black bears Ursus americanus. During eight years in which diversionary feeding was used, fewer bears (two bears) were removed for nuisance behaviour than in the three years before diversionary feeding started (six bears). Bears that visited the feeding site did not exhibit nuisance behaviour. A diversionary feeding site was operated during 1984–1991. This site was 0.25–3.4 km from a range of problem areas, including homes, a campground and a picnic site with unsecured bins and other food sources. The feeding location was stocked with beef fat and, sometimes, grapes. Bears were monitored using radio-tracking and direct observation and by ear tag returns from hunters.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)