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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effective control of non-native American mink by strategic trapping in a river catchment in mainland Britain

Published source details

Reynolds J.C., Richardson S.M., Rodgers B.J.E. & Rodgers O.R.K. (2013) Effective control of non-native American mink by strategic trapping in a river catchment in mainland Britain. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 77, 545-554


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in 2006–2010 in a river catchment in Herefordshire, UK (Reynolds et al. 2013) found that alongside control of invasive American mink Neovison vison, a released captive-bred water vole Arvicola amphibious population persisted for at least 20 months. Following releases of water voles over three years along a river where American mink were being controlled, the population persisted through to 20 months after the final release. At this time, voles occupied 13.3 km of river and authors reported that numbers remained fairly constant. Between March 2006 and February 2010, one hundred and fifteen mink were captured. Mink control entailed use of 44–114 mink rafts along 63–203 km of river within the catchment. Seven hundred captive-bred water voles were released, along the main channel of the River Dore, in August–September of 2006–2008. Voles were released from boxes in groups of up to six animals/box. Boxes were ≥25 m apart. Food was provided daily until voles vacated boxes (typically within three days). Vole signs (food stores, feedings signs and faeces) were monitored annually, each April or May, in 2007–2010.

(Summarised by Ricardo Rocha)