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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Methods of reducing deer–vehicle accidents: benefit–cost analysis

Published source details

Reed D.F., Beck T.D.I. & Woodward T.N. (1982) Methods of reducing deer–vehicle accidents: benefit–cost analysis. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 10, 349-354


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Install one-way gates or other structures to allow wildlife to leave roadways Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in the 1970s along two highways in California, USA (Reed et al. 1982) found that barrier fencing incorporating one-way gates reduced deer-vehicle collisions by 68–87%. Fewer deer Odocoileus spp. road mortalities were recorded after construction of the six fence sections (average 2/km/year) than before (average 11/km/year). Six different lengths (1.9–7.7 km) of 2.4-m fencing were installed along Interstate 70 and Colorado Highway 82. Five of the fences were only on one side of the road, the other was on both sides and connected to an underpass. Four of the fences had one-way gates to allow deer to escape from the highway. Deer carcasses found along the road were counted in each fenced area before and after installation. Cost-benefit analysis was also undertaken using pre-fence mortality (dead deer) and fence effectiveness and estimates of cost of vehicle repair, deer value, discount rate, cost of fence and cost of fence maintenance (see original article for results).

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)

Install barrier fencing along roads Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A before-and-after study in the 1970s along two highways in California, USA (Reed et al. 1982) found that barrier fences, including one connected to an underpass, and others to one-way gates, reduced deer-vehicle collisions by 68–87%. Fewer deer Odocoileus spp. road mortalities were recorded after construction of the six fence sections (average 2/km/year) than before (average 11/km/year). Six different lengths (1.9–7.7 km) of 2.4-m fencing were installed along Interstate 70 and Colorado Highway 82. Five of the fences were only on one side of the road, the other was on both sides and connected to an underpass. Four of the fences had one-way gates to allow deer to escape from the highway. Deer carcasses found along the road were counted in each fenced area before and after installation. Cost-benefit analysis was also undertaken using pre-fence mortality (dead deer) and fence effectiveness and estimates of cost of vehicle repair, value of deer, discount rate, cost of fence and cost of fence maintenance (see the original article for results).

(Summarised by Rebecca K. Smith)