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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Distribution of small mammals in a pastoral landscape of the Tibetan plateaus (Western Sichuan, China) and relationship with grazing practices

Published source details

Raoul F., Quéré J., Rieffel D., Bernard N., Takahashi K., Scheifler R., Ito A., Wang Q., Qiu J., Yang W., Craig P.S. & Giraudoux P. (2006) Distribution of small mammals in a pastoral landscape of the Tibetan plateaus (Western Sichuan, China) and relationship with grazing practices. Mammalia, 70, 214-225


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce intensity of grazing by domestic livestock Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A replicated, site comparison study in 2001 and 2002 on two winter pasture areas in Sichuan, China (Raoul et al. 2006) found that reduced livestock grazing intensity was associated with higher numbers of the tundra/lacustrine vole Microtus oeconomus/limnophilus complex but with lower numbers of Kam dwarf hamster Cricetulus kamensis. The numbers of tundra/lacustrine voles in low grazing intensity areas (7 individuals/100 trap nights) was higher than in medium (1/100 trap nights) or high grazing intensity areas (0/100 trap nights). The numbers of Kam dwarf hamster in low (0 individuals/100 trap night) and medium grazing intensity areas (0/100 trap nights) was lower than that in high grazing intensity areas (6/100 trap nights). Surveys were conducted in grassland and shrub areas in valley, wetland and slope habitats in winter pasture at 4,250 m altitude. Sites were grazed, in varying intensities, by yaks, sheep, goats, and horses, each October to early May. Small mammals were surveyed using back-break traps over three nights and days in July 2001 and July 2002.

(Summarised by Nick Littlewood)