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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Conservation of brown bear in the Alps: space use and settlement behavior of reintroduced bears

Published source details

Preatoni D., Mustoni A., Martinoli A., Carlini E., Chiarenzi B., Chiozzini S., Van Dongen S., Wauters L.A. & Tosi G. (2005) Conservation of brown bear in the Alps: space use and settlement behavior of reintroduced bears. Biological Conservation, 28, 189-197


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate to re-establish or boost populations in native range Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

A study in 1999–2003 in a temperate forest site in northern Italy (Preatoni et al. 2005) found that most translocated brown bears Ursus arctos survived 2–3 years after release. Two to three years after release of 10 bears, at least eight were alive. In 1999–2002, ten bears (3 males, 7 females; all 3–6 years old) were captured in two sites in Slovenia and fitted with radio-collars and ear-tag transmitters. Animals were released in Adamello-Brenta Natural Park, Italy. Bears were located from the ground twice each day using radio antennae, from May 1999 to October 2003.

(Summarised by Paul Gerlach )