Study

Assessing translocation outcome: Comparing behavioral and physiological aspects of translocated and resident African elephants (Loxodonta africana)

  • Published source details Pinter-Wollman N., Isbell L.A. & Hart L.A. (2009) Assessing translocation outcome: Comparing behavioral and physiological aspects of translocated and resident African elephants (Loxodonta africana). Biological Conservation, 142, 1116-1124

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate crop raiders away from crops (e.g. elephants) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Translocate crop raiders away from crops (e.g. elephants) to reduce human-wildlife conflict

    A controlled study in 2005–2006 of savanna in and around a national park in Kenya (Pinter-Wollman et al. 2009) found that translocated crop-raiding African elephants Loxodonta africana had a lower survival rate than non-translocated elephants at the same site. Twenty-four of 150 translocated elephants died within 55 days of translocation; from dying during translocation (six elephants), poaching (one), shooting by problem animal control officers (two) and unknown causes (three), whilst 12 calves went missing and were presumed to have died. Out of 103 elephants that survived this period and were successfully monitored, four (4%) died over year following release, compared to 77 out of 6,395 (1%) during the same time period from the non-translocated population in the same park. One hundred and fifty elephants were translocated 160 km to a national park, in September 2005, to reduce human-elephant conflicts related to crop damage at the source location. Locations of translocated elephants and resident elephants were monitored 4–5 times/week at the receptor site from road transects and 2–3 times/week by aerial surveys.

Output references

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